Join me in Santiago de Chile, at IATA Wings of Change conference – 2 free passes up for grabs

Chile has been in the news for the past couple of weeks, due to the earthquake. And then due to the resilient efforts of the Chileans in bringing the country back to its feet quickly. And the aviation community, lead by IATA is also doing its part by going ahead with FIDAE – the Chilean Airshow – and the Wings of Change conference, despite the damage incurred during the earthquake. One of the aims is to get visitors back to Chile as soon as possible. And yours truly is going to be there too.

I’ve been invited to deliver a workshop and speak on how airline brands can drive engagement, loyalty and revenues from the latest Web 2.0 technologies. In conjunction with that, IATA has kindly agreed to give away two free passes to FIDAE (the airshow) and Wings of Change (the conference) to SimpliFlying readers (yes, you!).

Read on to learn how you can be part of this celebration of resilience in Chile too, and rub shoulders with the likes of Patrick Murphy, former Chairman of Ryanair and the CEO of LAN Airlines.

How to win two passes to attend Wings of Change and FIDAE?

It’s simple. Just do either of the two things below.

  1. On the blog: Leave a comment on this article answering this question: Which is the foremost challenge Latin American airlines face today and how would you solve it?
  2. On Twitter: Follow @SimpliFlying and Tweet to us in 140 chars Which is the foremost challenge Latin American airlines face today. In your Tweet, you must mention @simpliflying (for tracking) and the URL for this article (http://bit.ly/FIDAE)

It’s that simple. Two winners will be announced on 19 March 2010, through a lucky draw. So the more you Tweet, and the more you comment, the better the chances of winning.

So, what’re you waiting for? Get started right now. And you never know, we might just meet face to face in two weeks in Chile!

Shashank Nigam

Shashank Nigam

Shashank Nigam is a globally sought-after consultant, speaker and thought leader on airline branding and customer engagement strategy. He is the Founder and CEO of SimpliFlying, one of the world’s largest aviation marketing firms working with over 85 aviation clients in the last ten years. Nigam is also the youngest winner of the Global Brand Leadership Award and has addressed senior executives globally, from Chile to China. Nigam’s impassioned and honest perspectives on airline marketing have found their way to over 100 leading media outlets, including the BBC, CNBC, Reuters and Bloomberg, and into leading publications such as The Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. He writes a dedicated monthly column in Flight’s Airline Business, challenging the typical assumptions about airline marketing. His new book on airline marketing, SOAR, is an Amazon bestseller that’s shaking up the industry and inspiring other industries to learn from the best airlines. Born in India, raised in Singapore, he now lives with his wife and two young daughters in Toronto.
Shashank Nigam
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Showing 6 comments
  • patriciabue
    Reply

    I firmly believe that LCCs should not be a local phenomenon from Mexico and Brazil.Latin AMerican aviation is facing a great moment .

    Panic at the beginning of 2009 dissolved fairly quickly when there were signs and facts that showed that Latin America was not being hit by the economic downturn so fiercely as the US and Europe, instead swine flu and each country`s political and economic crisis had greater impact.

    ALTA figures before the economic downturn, had shown that Latin American airlines where growing more than the global average, this trend returned fairly quickly , recovery numbers from Latin American airlines demonstrated a difference with airlines in other regions. (IATA and ALTA reports througout the year) .

    Latin American countries are better connected now than ever before, the intra-Latin American demand is growing , and the competition is on the rise too.

    The OAG report from February 2010 indicates that Latin American air services continue to expand within the region, with 185,970 flights scheduled for February 2010. This reflects an increase of 12% (19,891 more flights). Capacity also shows a positive growth of 15% with 2,563,551 seats on offer.

    So come investors, interesting AIRSPACE opportunities in this region!

    Hope to see you in 2 weeks!!

  • hcsv
    Reply

    the foremost challenge that LAM airlines are facing is indicative of issues that other airlines face equally: strategic cost management. The long-term winners will be large airline groups that can extract high yields, as well as low-cost carriers that manage to maintain their cultures and their keen focus on affordable air travel. Second-tier carriers face some difficult choices, coming under increasing pressure and subject to the ongoing business cycles in the industry.

  • hcsv
    Reply

    Stratgeic cost nmanagement and segment focus. The long-term winners will be large airline groups that can extract high yields, as well as low-cost carriers that manage to maintain their cultures and their keen focus on affordable air travel. Second-tier carriers face some difficult choices, coming under increasing pressure and subject to the ongoing business cycles in the industry.

  • hasa
    Reply

    Hi,

    greatest challenge is to survive the crisis, like everywhere else. Appart from that: political inteferience.

  • mariosantoyo
    Reply

    Shashank,

    I've just returned from my business trip in SCL. And wanted to share some highlights of the city after the quake:

    * Two weeks after they were hit the city is back to normal operation.
    * goverment and private companies have already initiated maintenance operations on the infrastructure that was actually damaged (eg. the airport, roads, some buildings in certain parts of town, etc.).
    * Landscape is way far from beign a ground zero sight.
    * the general sentiment about the quake and the aftershocks (they have some still) is a mix of respect, awareness and commonness.
    * Airport is operational using temporary installations (eg. tents, laptops for migration, etc), and you might have to face some lines either entering or leaving the country but nothing umberable.

    Chileans could be described as tough, and I am pretty sure they will bounce back stronger and better prepared for future disasters after they finish their current ordeal.

    • Shashank Nigam
      Reply

      Thanks for the update Mario! I'm looking forward to being in SCL next
      week!

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